All posts by UC Arts Digital Lab

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From Popper to Ruby Jones: image copyrights in the age of Wikipedia

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Do you need permission to film a mural? Who owns the copyright for Popper’s passport photo? How do you get a photo into Wikipedia? Is museum taxidermy art, and can you legally photograph it? What is copyfraud? New Zealand Wikipedian at Large Dr Mike Dickison will talk about how we can share our photographs  and protect artists’ rights, in an age where everyone has a camera in their pocket and reproduction costs nothing.

Date: Friday 7 June

Time: 12:00–1:00 pm

Venue: A3 Lecture Theatre, Ilam Campus, University of Canterbury

Workshop: Hands-on Wikipedia

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If you’ve ever wanted to know how Wikipedia works and how to edit it, come along to this practical workshop organised by the NZ Wikipedian at Large, Dr Mike Dickison. There’ll be a one-hour talk and tutorial to begin, followed by an afternoon of hands-on editing. Bring a laptop.

Date: Mon 20 May

Time: 1:00–4:00 pm (main presentation 1:00–2:00)

Venue: 388 Puaka-James Hight (TBC)

How To Vandalise Wikipedia – a talk by NZ Wikipedian at Large,17 May 2019

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Did you hear about the young farmer from Dannevirke who got his name added to a Wikipedia list of mythical Japanese monsters, and it ended up appearing in a board game? Stories like this make it seem like Wikipedia’s easy to vandalise; how much can we trust it? How do we detect hoaxes? If we were sociopathic enough to want to get false information into the encyclopaedia and make it stick, what would we need to know? New Zealand Wikipedian at Large Dr Mike Dickison has been travelling the country encouraging the public to improve the accuracy of Wikipedia, but in this one-off exclusive talk he’ll turn things around and reveal the grubby world of making it less accurate.

Date: Fri 17 May

Time: 1:00–2:00

Venue: A1 lecture theatre

From Popper to Ruby Rose: image copyrights in the age of Wikipedia – a talk by NZ Wikipedian at Large, 7 June 2019

By | Events, Seminars, Visitors | No Comments

Do you need permission to film a mural? Who owns the copyright for Popper’s passport photo? How do you get a photo into Wikipedia? Is museum taxidermy art, and can you legally photograph it? What is copyfraud? New Zealand Wikipedian at Large Dr Mike Dickison will talk about how we can share our photographs and protect artists’ rights, in an age where everyone has a camera in their pocket and reproduction costs nothing.

Date: Friday 7 June

Time: 12.00-1.00

Venue: A3 lecture theatre

Digital Humanities Meetup: Red Zone Stories

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When: Thursday, 15th November, 3-4pm
Where: Spark Place, Community Level 1, Tūranga

Join us for a seminar on Red Zone Stories, an app developed by the UC Arts Digital Lab to record and share community stories about past and possible future spaces in the Residential Red Zone.

In this session the Arts Digital Lab team will give an overview of the project and invite members to download and try an early version of the app.* The idea of this session is to encourage people to start contributing their stories, connections to, or thoughts about the Red Zone.

* this app is currently only available on Android devices, but we do have a website version that those without an Android device can use.

** As this is a Human Ethics approved project, you will need to agree to and sign a consent form before contributing material to the app/website.

Digital Humanities Meetup: Methods for Parsing Spatial and Temporal Data

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When: 3-5pm, 11th October

Where: Poutama Room 388, Puaka-James Hight Library, University of Canterbury

Dr Ben Adams (UC Geography)

“A massive amount of geographic (spatial) and historical (temporal) information exists in document collections online and in libraries. Because these datasets are often too large to annotate by hand, computational tools are required. In this session, we will discuss some existing geoparsing and temporal parsing tools that can be used to automate this process for textual documents. We will look at a variety of options, including web services and open source software. The tools are getting better but they are still error-prone, so we will also highlight some issues to keep an eye out for when using them.”

Digital Methods and Tools Seminar Series #7: Geospatial Corpora

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Wednesday, October 3rd, 1pm in Locke 611A

Dr Ben Adams (Geography) and Dr Jonathan Dunn (Linguistics)

Dr Ben Adams from Geography and Dr Jonathan Dunn from Linguistics are presenting on “Geospatial Corpora” as part of the COMS and UC Arts Digital Lab “Digital Methods and Tools Seminar Series”.

Ben will present his project Frankenplace (www.frankenplace.com), an interactive thematic map search engine that uses geographic context as a means to discover, organize, and interactively visualize the documents related to a search query. Jonathan will present the Common Crawl Global Dialect Corpus, a new dataset for understanding regional patterns in language use that is drawn from ~80 billion web sites and contains examples of hundreds of languages across every country in the world. Ben is a Senior Lecturer in Geography and Jonathan is a Lecturer in Linguistics.

Digital Methods and Tools Seminar Series #6: Network Analysis

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Wednesday, 19 September, 1pm in Locke 611A

Dr Wan Chi Leung (Media & Communication)

Social network analysis (SNA) refers to structural research that examines the ties linking social actors. It adds a dimension or set of factors that can explain human behaviours, viewing individuals as actors embedded in thick webs of social relations and interactions, and each person’s connections may affect his or her behaviours. SNA can help us understand more about collective actions, organization behaviours, social influence, and transmissions of diseases, ideas, and information. In this seminar, we will discuss the basic concepts of SNA, and the use of UCINet as a software package for SNA. UCINet: https://sites.google.com/site/ucinetsoftware/

Digital Methods and Tools Seminar Series #5: Digital Methods in Practice

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Wednesday, 12 September, 1pm in Locke 611A

Dr Geoff Ford (UC Arts Digital Lab)

In previous sessions in the “Digital Methods and Tools Seminar Series” we have talked about collecting textual data from the web, analysing texts using corpus methods and visualising data. In this session Geoff will draw some of these themes together and will build on them by talking about digital methods in practice in his PhD research (analysing economic rhetoric using corpus methods) and recent work in the UC Arts Digital Lab (analysing academic research using bibliometrics).

Geoff will focus on three questions:

  1. What are some of the issues with building and analysing large text corpora and how can we address these?
  2. What are the possibilities of “scraping” beyond texts on the web (e.g. radio and television)?
  3. How can we use bibliometric analysis tools to provide new insights into the academic literature we deal with? (or, How to make a pretty network diagram out of a literature search?)

For the last question, if you want to follow along download VosViewer.

Geoff is a Postdoctoral Fellow with the UC Arts Digital Lab. In his recent PhD research Geoff built a 57-million word corpus of New Zealand’s parliamentary debates and an audio corpus based on 1788 hours of talk radio broadcasts and analysed common features of public rhetoric related to the economy.

Digital Information System for the History of Astral Sciences (DISHAS)

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Digital Humanities Meetups welcomes guest speaker Dr Anuj Misra from the Observatoire de Paris. Details of the talk below.

When: 6th September, 3-4pm
Where: Poutama Room 388, Puaka-James Hight Library, UC Canterbury.

Abstract:

With increasing collections of historical sources becoming accessible to different scholars from different areas of expertise, the advances in digital humanities provide powerful means to analyse, edit, and relate this growing corpus in more meaningful ways that one may have previously imagined. The DISHAS project (Digital Information System for the History of Astral Sciences) is an ERC-funded research project based at the SYRTE Laboratory, Observatoire de Paris in France that works in designing digital solutions to aid in the study of the history of astral sciences. DISHAS relies on a collaborative network of international projects in Chinese, Sanskrit, Arabic, Latin and Hebrew traditions as it develops digital tools to store, edit, and analyse different types of `knowledge-structures’ in the history of astral sciences, namely, scientific instruments, prose and versified texts, iconography and technical/geometrical diagrams, and astronomical tables. This talk introduces the current state of DISHAS as it works with astronomical tables as its preliminary developmental focus.

Bio:

Dr Anuj Misra is a historian of mathematics who works on medieval and early modern sources in Sanskrit mathematical astronomy. His research focuses on structural changes in systems of knowledge, in particular, the Islamic influence in Sanskrit astronomical texts and tables of early modern Mughal India. Dr Misra is adept at reading several classical languages of antiquity and mainly works with primary sources (manuscripts) in his study of cross-cultural transmission of mathematical ideas. He is trained in theoretical physics and philosophy and maintains a keen research interest in areas of computational humanities, mathematical anthropology, cognitive linguistics, and philosophy of mathematics. He is currently a postdoctoral fellow of the Systèmes de Référence Temps Espace (SYRTE) Laboratory at the Observatoire de Paris in France.