All posts by UC Arts Digital Lab

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End-of-Year Digital Humanities Meetup Get-Together

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Please join us as we review highlights from the year and look toward next year. We will have refreshments, so you can enjoy a chat and give us feedback on what topics you’d like to see in future. There will also be a showcase of some of the Arts Digital Lab’s recent projects that you won’t want to miss.

Where: Puaka-James Hight Library, Room 388

When: Tuesday 14 November, 3-5 pm

Crowdsourcing the Macdonald Dictionary

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If you’re a UC student interested in Digital Humanities, you might like to help us out with the Macdonald Dictionary crowdsourcing project, a feminist public history project being developed by Canterbury Museum and UC.

The project is transcribing names from handwritten index cards that document the biographies of European settlers in Canterbury. We aim to record the names of the women and children who are mostly absent from the collection’s existing metadata. There are over 12,000 cards, so it’s a pretty significant task!

You can participate by dropping in to the UC Arts Digital Lab (Rm 414 in Karl Popper) between now and 10 November, 10:00am – 3:00pm. All you need to do is read and transcribe names from a brief handwritten text, then answer a few questions about the process. It’s fun! So, take a break from exam study, nab some Whittaker’s chocolate as a reward, and–most importantly–help us better understand our local history by bringing women out of the shadows.

If you have any questions, please email Antoine at antoine.landrieu@canterbury.ac.nz

Canterbury Westland Regional Digital Forum 2017

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Last week we attended the Canterbury Westland Regional Digital Forum, held at the Halswell Library.  As well as being a valuable forum for discussing regional issues and sharing our latest projects with our colleagues across the sector, the day presented an opportunity for our Digital Projects Specialist, Antoine Landrieu, to show off his video editing skills, producing this short film about our day:

Digital Humanities Honours Information Session

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Are you interested in studying Digital Humanities as part of your honours year in 2018? Come along to our information session to find out more about Digital Humanities, the DIGI honours courses available, and how you can combine Digital Humanities with other Arts subjects.

Where: Karl Popper 612
When: 2-3pm, Wednesday 11 October

You are also welcome to contact the Digital Humanities Programme Coordinator Dr Chris Thomson for more information: christopher.thomson@canterbury.ac.nz

Digital Humanities Meetup: Online Collections & Exhibitions

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You’re invited to our 4th Digital Humanities monthly meetup: “Online Collections & Exhibitions: An Introduction to Omeka”.

When: Tuesday 30 May, 3-5 pm

Where: Puaka-James Hight Library Building, Room 388

Omeka (https://omeka.org/about/) is a free, open-source web publishing platform for the display of collections and exhibitions. It’s used by libraries, museums, archives, scholars and communities around the world – including students and researchers here at UC, with the support of the UC Arts Digital Lab.

Staff from the Lab will showcase two key Lab projects that demonstrate the power and versatility of Omeka, and will walk participants through setting up a simple Omeka site. You’ll get the most out of this workshop if you bring your own laptop with VirtualBox (https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads) installed. If you don’t have a laptop, you’ll still be able to follow along on the main screen, or by pairing up with someone J

If you’d like help installing VirtualBox, feel free to drop into the UC Digital Arts Lab (Karl Popper 414) any day between 9-5pm, before Tuesday 30th.

Digital Humanities Meetup #3: Internet Memes

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When: 26 April 2017, 3.00 – 5.00 pm

Where: UC Puaka-James Hight Library Building, Room 388

The 3rd Digital Humanities monthly meetup is entitled “Internet Memes: The crumbling boundaries between the serious and the unserious”.

The study of Internet memes is new both as concept and practice. This is largely due to the novelty of the concept itself, as well as the academic resistance against the serious study of the unserious. But the boundary between the serious and unserious is crumbling, and cyberculturally literate scholars have emerged to tackle the task of studying memes.

This presentation will explore the three major traditions of meme studies in their historical, theoretical and cultural contexts, introducing the most prominent thinkers and how they are shaping the future of meme studies. The presentation will be followed by a workshop in which participants will learn how to start their own memepage on Facebook. A laptop or a smartphone is recommended for the workshop, but not required.

As always, feel free to invite others and we look forward to seeing you!

Professor Alan Liu, Visiting Fulbright Specialist: a 6-week festival of Digital Humanities in Aotearoa-New Zealand

By | Events, News, Seminars, Visitors | No Comments

The University of Canterbury Digital Humanities (UCDH) Programme is excited to announce six weeks of Digital Humanities activity, anchored by the visit of Professor Alan Liu from the University of California Santa Barbara. Professor Liu will be visiting as a Fulbright Visiting Specialist from October 19 to November 29, with the generous support of the Fulbright Scholar Program.

Professor Patricia Fumerton (UC Santa Barbara) will also stay with us as a Visiting Scholar in Residence, for the last two weeks of Alan’s visit. Patricia’s research interests centre on Early Modern culture and literature, and she will lead a trans-Tasman workshop on Early Modern digital humanities during her stay. We’re also delighted to have two Australian visitors who will be contributing to our conversations during this period: Assoc. Professor Tim Sherratt (University of Canberra, Trove), and  Professor Paul Arthur (University of Western Sydney). Dr. Sydney Shep, Reader in Book History at Wai-te-Ata Press, Victoria University of Wellington, will participate in our discussion on cyberinfrastructure on November 12th. Details of these talks are listed in the schedule below, and we’ll be posting more about our visitors soon.

Background on Alan Liu

from http://liu.english.ucsb.edu/

Alan is a Professor in the English Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and an affiliated faculty member of UCSB’s Media Arts & Technology graduate program. Previously, he was on the faculty of Yale University’s English Department and British Studies Program.

events-liuHe began his research in the field of British romantic literature and art. His first book, Wordsworth: The Sense of History (Stanford Univ. Press, 1989), explored the relation between the imaginative experiences of literature and history. In a series of theoretical essays in the 1990s, he explored cultural criticism, the “new historicism,” and postmodernism in contemporary literary studies. In 1994, when he started his Voice of the Shuttle web site for humanities research, he began to study information culture as a way to close the circuit between the literary or historical imagination and the technological imagination.  In 2004, he published The Laws of Cool: Knowledge Work and the Culture of Information (University of Chicago Press). He also published his Local Transcendence: Essays on Postmodern Historicism and the Database (University of Chicago Press) in 2008.

Everyone is welcome to attend our series of seminars and discussions, which will take place at the University of Canterbury, the University of Otago, and Victoria University of Wellington. Come prepared to extend both your own thinking, and ours!

See below for details of the upcoming events. Please note, time and location for some events are yet to be confirmed.

Date / Room Title Description Location
Wed. 21st October, 1-2pm

Undercroft 101

A manifesto for tactical DH research infrastructure A seminar by Assoc. Prof. Tim Sherratt, U. Canberra / Trove. University of Canterbury, Christchurch.
Wed. 28th October, 4-5.30

Undercroft 101

Key Trends in DH & their challenge to the idea of the Humanities A public lecture by Prof. Alan Liu, UC Santa Barbara. University of Canterbury, Christchurch.
Wed. 28th October, 1-3pm

Seminar Room, Ground Floor, Science Library

Digital Interventions A seminar by Assoc. Prof. Tim Sherratt, University of Canberra / Trove. University of Otago, Dunedin.
Thurs. 5th November, 3-5pm

Undercroft 101

The Future of the Humanities A workshop led by Prof. Alan Liu, UC Santa Barbara. University of Canterbury, Christchurch.
Thurs. 12th November, 1-5 pm

James Hight 210

Alan Liu, ‘Against the Cultural Singularity’, James Smithies, ‘Towards a Systems Analysis of the Humanities’, Paul Arthur ‘Smart Infrastructures for Cultural and Social Research’ followed by workshop The Frontiers of DH: Humanities Systems Infrastructure: Alan Liu, Paul Arthur, James Smithies followed by workshop discussion. University of Canterbury, Christchurch.

 

Fri. 13th November, 10am-12pm

Popper 413

Open meeting Follow-up from Humanities Systems Infrastructure workshop University of Canterbury, Christchurch.
Wed. 18th November

Undercroft 101

Early Modern DH: A Trans-tasman Conversation A workshop led by Prof. Patricia Fumerton, UC Santa Barbara. University of Canterbury, Christchurch.
Thurs. 26th November

Time & Place TBC

Broadside Ballads and Tactical Publics: ‘The Lady and the Blackamoor,’ 1570-1789 A public lecture by Prof. Patricia Fumerton, UC Santa Barbara. University of Otago, Dunedin.
Fri. 27th November, 2-3 pm.

Place TBC

Literature+ A conversation about Alan Liu’s Literature+ course. University of Otago, Dunedin.
Fri. 27th November, 5.15-6.15 pm.

Place TBC

What Everyone Says – 4Humanities A public lecture by Prof. Alan Liu, UC Santa Barbara. University of Otago, Dunedin.
Tues. 1st December, 1-2:30 pm

Stout Centre, Kelburn Campus

Key Trends in DH & their challenge to the idea of the Humanities A public lecture by Prof. Alan Liu, UC Santa Barbara. University of Victoria at Wellington
Tues. 1st December, 3-4:30 pm

Stout Centre, Kelburn Campus

Samuel Pepys and “Greensleeves”: A DH Perspective A public lecture by Prof. Patricia Fumerton, UC Santa Barbara. University of Victoria at Wellington

 

DIGI 401: Digital Methods lecture outline and open invite

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UC Digital Humanities is pleased to advise that the lectures for DIGI 401: Digital Methods, 2015, will be open to all-comers. The course provides an overview of digital tools and methods applicable to all arts, humanities, and social science disciplines. We’re conscious many students, and staff, might like to attend a few lectures on specific topics of interest. Please contact James Smithies if you plan on arriving with a sizeable group.

The course is co-taught by staff based in the UC Digital Humanities Programme, UC Computer Science and Software Engineering, UC CEISMIC Digital Archive, UC Geography, and Catalyst IT.

Location

Monday, 12.00 – 1.00 pm, A6 lecture theatre.

Tuesday 1.00pm – 2.00 pm, Karl Popper 508.

Thursday 3.00 – 4.00 pm, Rutherford 542.

Lecturers

James Smithies (JS). Course convener.

Tim Bell (TB).

Grant Paton-Simpson (GP).

Chris Thomson (CT).

Alison Watkins (AW).

 

Week

Lecture

Laboratory

Setup, Theory & Methodological Background

1 / 23 Feb. Introduction (JS) WordPress
Digital Humanities (JS)  
2 / 2 Mar. Digital Research Infrastructure (JS) Using the UCDH Virtual Machine
Software Development (JS)
3 / 9 Mar. Project Management (JS) Project Management
Materiality and Digital Forensics (JS)

Tools & Methods

4 / 16 Mar. Distant reading and algorithmic criticism (JS) Algorithmic Analysis
Data Visualization (JS)  
5 / 23 Mar. Topic Modelling (JS) Raspberry PI
Metadata and Linked Open Data (JS)
6 / 30 Mar. TEI I (CT) TEI
TEI II (CT)
7 / 27 April ANZAC Day Omeka
Crowd-sourcing (JS)
8 / 4 May GIS I (JS) Omeka + Neatline
GIS II (AW)
9 / 11 May Data Analysis I (JS) Data Management & Analysis
Data Analysis II (GP)
10 / 18 May Python (TB) Python (CT)
Python (TB)
11 / 25 May Python (TB) Python (CT)
Python (TB)
12 / 1 June Queen’s Birthday Python (CT)
Conclusion (JS)