Category Archives: Events

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Canterbury Westland Regional Digital Forum 2017

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Last week we attended the Canterbury Westland Regional Digital Forum, held at the Halswell Library.  As well as being a valuable forum for discussing regional issues and sharing our latest projects with our colleagues across the sector, the day presented an opportunity for our Digital Projects Specialist, Antoine Landrieu, to show off his video editing skills, producing this short film about our day:

Digital Humanities Honours Information Session

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Are you interested in studying Digital Humanities as part of your honours year in 2018? Come along to our information session to find out more about Digital Humanities, the DIGI honours courses available, and how you can combine Digital Humanities with other Arts subjects.

Where: Karl Popper 612
When: 2-3pm, Wednesday 11 October

You are also welcome to contact the Digital Humanities Programme Coordinator Dr Chris Thomson for more information: christopher.thomson@canterbury.ac.nz

Digital Humanities Meetup: Online Collections & Exhibitions

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You’re invited to our 4th Digital Humanities monthly meetup: “Online Collections & Exhibitions: An Introduction to Omeka”.

When: Tuesday 30 May, 3-5 pm

Where: Puaka-James Hight Library Building, Room 388

Omeka (https://omeka.org/about/) is a free, open-source web publishing platform for the display of collections and exhibitions. It’s used by libraries, museums, archives, scholars and communities around the world – including students and researchers here at UC, with the support of the UC Arts Digital Lab.

Staff from the Lab will showcase two key Lab projects that demonstrate the power and versatility of Omeka, and will walk participants through setting up a simple Omeka site. You’ll get the most out of this workshop if you bring your own laptop with VirtualBox (https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads) installed. If you don’t have a laptop, you’ll still be able to follow along on the main screen, or by pairing up with someone J

If you’d like help installing VirtualBox, feel free to drop into the UC Digital Arts Lab (Karl Popper 414) any day between 9-5pm, before Tuesday 30th.

Digital Humanities Meetup #3: Internet Memes

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When: 26 April 2017, 3.00 – 5.00 pm

Where: UC Puaka-James Hight Library Building, Room 388

The 3rd Digital Humanities monthly meetup is entitled “Internet Memes: The crumbling boundaries between the serious and the unserious”.

The study of Internet memes is new both as concept and practice. This is largely due to the novelty of the concept itself, as well as the academic resistance against the serious study of the unserious. But the boundary between the serious and unserious is crumbling, and cyberculturally literate scholars have emerged to tackle the task of studying memes.

This presentation will explore the three major traditions of meme studies in their historical, theoretical and cultural contexts, introducing the most prominent thinkers and how they are shaping the future of meme studies. The presentation will be followed by a workshop in which participants will learn how to start their own memepage on Facebook. A laptop or a smartphone is recommended for the workshop, but not required.

As always, feel free to invite others and we look forward to seeing you!

Eric Meyer visit

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We were delighted to welcome Professor Eric Meyer back to the University of Canterbury for a brief visit over the past two days. Eric previously visited the UC Digital Humanities programme as a Visiting Canterbury Fellow in 2014, and was back in New Zealand to speak at the National Digital Forum in Wellington earlier this week. He very kindly added a Christchurch leg to his trip, so we were able to hear him speak yesterday about work arising from his book Knowledge Machines (with Ralph Schroeder, published in 2015 by The MIT Press), then this morning we attended his workshop entitled “Metrics and Measurement: The Impacts of Digital Resources and Collections”.

The workshop stimulated some broad ranging discussion that moved from ways of measuring impact into exploration of data collection tools and methods of data analysis in various fields of research. A number of our Media & Communications postgrads took the opportunity to ask Eric about possibilities and limitations of using social media data, which led to some interesting debate.

Thank you, Eric & Michelle, for making the trip down to see us in Christchurch – we wish you safe travels for the journey home. And thanks National Digital Forum for inviting Eric to speak and getting him over to our part of the world!

 

Eric Meyer speaking at the University of Canterbury on 24 November 2016.

Professor Eric Meyer of the Oxford Internet Institute addresses UC staff and postgrads

Metrics and Measurement: The Impacts of Digital Resources and Collections

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Following his talk on Thursday 24 November, Professor Eric Meyer will also lead a workshop while he is at UC:

Metrics and Measurement: The Impacts of Digital Resources and Collections
Friday 25 November, 9am-12pm, Macmillan Brown PS 208

This workshop will present a framework and best practices for measuring usage and impact of digitised scholarly resources. The workshop will cover quantitative and qualitative methods outlined in the Toolkit for the Impact of Digitised Scholarly Resources and how organisations can apply these to their own collections and projects. Participants will learn from case studies and work through participant-provided examples to gain a better understanding of:

  • Web presence, what it means, and how it can be measured with analytics;
  • Social media data, and how one can get it and use it for understanding impacts both quantitatively and qualitatively;
  • Scientometric data, and how one can interpret it;
  • Interviewing and surveying users.

Morning tea will be provided. Please RSVP by Monday 21 October to christopher.thomson@canterbury.ac.nz for catering purposes

To get the most out of the workshop, participants will need to bring a laptop that can connect to the Internet.

Eric Meyer is Professor of Social Informatics and Director of Graduate Studies at the Oxford Internet Institute, a multidisciplinary department at the University of Oxford which undertakes teaching and research focused on understanding life online. Eric’s work focuses on shifts in work, knowledge creation, and human interactions when digital technologies replace previously non-digital counterparts. His research in this area has included studies of the impacts of digital collections in libraries and museums, digital practices in the arts, the use of digital images in biology, and digital information practices in the sciences and humanities.

 

 

Knowledge Machines: Digital Transformations of the Sciences and Humanities

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The UC Arts Digital Lab is pleased to present a talk by Professor Eric Meyer of the Oxford Internet Institute:

Knowledge Machines: Digital Transformations of the Sciences and Humanities
Thursday 24 November, 2-3pm, Karl Popper 612

In this talk, Eric Meyer will discuss his 2015 book Knowledge Machines: Digital Transformations of the Sciences and Humanities, in which he and his co-author Ralph Schroeder argue that digital technologies have fundamentally changed research practices in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Meyer and Schroeder show that digital tools and data, used collectively and in distributed mode—which they term e-research—have transformed not just the consumption of knowledge but also the production of knowledge.

Digital technologies for research are reshaping how knowledge advances in disciplines that range from physics to literary analysis. This book considers the transformations of research from a number of perspectives, drawing especially on the sociology of science and technology and social informatics. It shows that the use of digital tools and data is not just a technical issue; it affects research practices, collaboration models, publishing choices, and even the kinds of research and research questions scholars choose to pursue. Knowledge Machines examines the nature and implications of these transformations for scholarly research.

Eric Meyer is Professor of Social Informatics and Director of Graduate Studies at the Oxford Internet Institute, a multidisciplinary department at the University of Oxford which undertakes teaching and research focused on understanding life online. Eric’s work focuses on shifts in work, knowledge creation, and human interactions when digital technologies replace previously non-digital counterparts. His research in this area has included studies of the impacts of digital collections in libraries and museums, digital practices in the arts, the use of digital images in biology, and digital information practices in the sciences and humanities.

 

 

Medieval and Early Modern Digital Humanities: Postgraduate Seminar at the University of Canterbury

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This Wednesday 18 November the Australian and New Zealand Association of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (ANZAMEMS) is holding a Postgraduate Advanced Training Seminar (PATS) at the University of Canterbury. Organised in conjunction with UC’s Festival of Digital Humanities, the seminar will focus on digital research methods for scholars in Medieval and Early Modern history, literary studies, and musicology.

The full-day event will take place in Undercroft 101. It will be compered by Tracy Adams (Associate Professor of French, University of Auckland), and feature keynote presentations by Prof. Patricia Fumerton (University of California Santa Barbara) and Prof. Lyn Tribble (University of Otago). There will also be a hands-on session. In this, Professor Fumerton will give an overview of the English Broadside Ballads Archive, a multi-million dollar project funded by the U.S. National Endowment for the Humanities that has been digitising, transcribing, reconstructing music and songs, and creating scholarship for many thousands of early modern ballads (the “ephemeral” new media of the time), and James Smithies (UC Digital Humanities) will guide participants on how to write a digital project scope document. The day will conclude with a panel discussion by James Smithies, Chris Jones (UC History), and Joanna Condon (Macmillan Brown Library), chaired by Anton Angelo (UC Library Research Repository).

The PATS will bring 15 postgraduate students from around New Zealand and Australia to UC for the day. It will also be live-streamed on YouTube and simulcast in universities across Australasia. Archive versions will be available on this site afterwards.

The full schedule is as follows:

9.00                 Welcome
9.15–10.30      Keynote by Professor Lyn Tribble, followed by discussion
11.00–11.30    Morning tea
11.30–12.45    Keynote by Professor Patricia Fumerton, followed by discussion
12.45 – 1.45    Lunch
1.45 – 3.00      Behind the scenes at EBBA / How to write a digital project scope document
3.00 – 3.30      Afternoon tea
3.30 – 4.45      Panel discussion by Anton Angelo, James Smithies, Chris Jones, and Joanna Condon
6.00                 Dinner

PATS Poster_Final_sml

 

 

 

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