Digital Methods and Tools Seminar Series #3 – Introduction to Web Scraping

Wednesday, 15 August, 1pm in Locke 611A

Dr Christopher Thomson (English & Digital Humanities)

Chris will introduce web scraping, an approach to collecting research data and automating research tasks. First we’ll briefly consider types of data that may interest us, and ask when web scraping may be the right approach for collecting them. Second, we’ll cover some concepts needed to understand how web scraping works. Then we’ll put these ideas into practice with the Web Scraper extension for the Chrome browser (https://tinyurl.com/o9cncoa). We’ll collect some texts that could be used for discourse analysis, as described in Donald’s talk last week. This will be more a ‘walk-through’ than an interactive tutorial, but you might like to bring your laptop with the extension installed if you would like to follow along. If there’s time, we’ll also identify some limitations we are likely to encounter, and provide some starting points for programming your own web scraper.




Digital Methods and Tools Seminar Series #2: Analysing large amounts of text using a concordance

Join UC Coms and the UC Arts Digital Lab today for the second in the Digital Methods and Tools seminar series: Analysing large amounts of text using a concordance.




Digital Methods and Tools Seminar Series #1




Digital Humanities Meetup: Open Tools + Open Data

Join us for a DH Meetup run in collaboration with UC Library on the fundamentals of using open data and open tools for research. This session will be led by Anton Angelo, UC Library’s Research Data Coordinator.

When: Thursday 16th August, 3-5pm

Where: Room 388, Puaka-James Hight Library, University of Canterbury

Light refreshments provided. All welcome.




Digital Humanities Meetup: R Data Visualisation

Join us for an introductory workshop on data visualisation in R Studio, with Vica Papp (NZILBB).  All welcome.

When: Thursday 28 June, 3-5 pm

Where: Room 388, Puaka-James Hight




The Canterbury Roll Symposium

As well as the discussions and presentations, the symposium gave us an opportunity to examine the Roll in person.

Last Friday, staff and students involved in the Canterbury Roll project, along with a team from Nottingham Trent University here to do a scientific analysis on the Roll, met for a symposium to discuss progress so far and our next steps.

Natasha Hodgson of Nottingham Trent University talks about some of the Roll’s features.

 

Chris Thomson discusses the significance of the Digital Edition, and the work the Arts Digital Lab has been doing.

We had some great presentations from the various people involved in the project: everything from the project’s lead transcriber, Maree Shirota, talking about how the Roll fits into the larger picture of medieval genealogies, to Haida Laing of Nottingham Trent talking about how her team use the latest imaging technologies to discover the secrets of ancient documents and artworks.  Even our Arts Digital Lab interns, Josh Kim and Jayson Boon, gave a presentation, talking about the work they’re doing marking up in TEI the connections between historical figures on the Roll.

An important part of the symposium was a round-table discussion of the next stages for the project – watch this space!

 

Jayson Boon and Josh Kim answer questions about their markup work




Migrating QuakeStudies to Islandora

At the National Digital Forum in Wellington last month, Jennifer, along with Jonathan Hunt from Catalyst IT, gave a presentation on progress with migrating QuakeStudies to the new Islandora platform:




Ladies First: Crowdsourcing the Macdonald Dictionary

Chris Thomson, with Joanna Szczepanski from the Canterbury Museum, gave a presentation to NDF2017 last week, describing the Macdonald Dictionary Crowdsourcing project, a recent collaboration between the Lab and the Museum.

Watch their presentation:




Canterbury Westland Regional Digital Forum 2017

Last week we attended the Canterbury Westland Regional Digital Forum, held at the Halswell Library.  As well as being a valuable forum for discussing regional issues and sharing our latest projects with our colleagues across the sector, the day presented an opportunity for our Digital Projects Specialist, Antoine Landrieu, to show off his video editing skills, producing this short film about our day:




Digital Humanities Meetup: Online Collections & Exhibitions

You’re invited to our 4th Digital Humanities monthly meetup: “Online Collections & Exhibitions: An Introduction to Omeka”.

When: Tuesday 30 May, 3-5 pm

Where: Puaka-James Hight Library Building, Room 388

Omeka (https://omeka.org/about/) is a free, open-source web publishing platform for the display of collections and exhibitions. It’s used by libraries, museums, archives, scholars and communities around the world – including students and researchers here at UC, with the support of the UC Arts Digital Lab.

Staff from the Lab will showcase two key Lab projects that demonstrate the power and versatility of Omeka, and will walk participants through setting up a simple Omeka site. You’ll get the most out of this workshop if you bring your own laptop with VirtualBox (https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads) installed. If you don’t have a laptop, you’ll still be able to follow along on the main screen, or by pairing up with someone J

If you’d like help installing VirtualBox, feel free to drop into the UC Digital Arts Lab (Karl Popper 414) any day between 9-5pm, before Tuesday 30th.